warning signsSafety labels can save lives. Even though you have knowledgeable and skilful workers and employees, as long as they are working in a hazardous environment, it can still be risky. Maintaining a safe environment can be achieved through proper recognition of health and safety dangers.

By ensuring regulatory compliance and using identification labels, you can minimise potential liabilities in the future. Furthermore, a business or an organization can use their time efficiently, focus on their work at hand, and have the peace of mind that they are working in a controlled space.

Wire and Cable Labelling

Proper indication and labels on wires and cables can prevent accidents, especially if these pertain to electrical control panels. Furthermore, it will be a lot easier for your employees to locate and identify particular wire harnesses and data systems. Labelling will save you time and cost. Non-adhesive tags, cable flags, self-laminating labels, wrap-around labels, and heat-shrink tubing are some types of electrical labelling.

Floor Marking

Having the right colours in the right places can go a long way. You can keep workers on the right path and keep them from hazardous areas. Furthermore, with proper floor markings, you can easily identify equipment, locate storage areas, and recognise forklift traffic.

Here’s a guide on the colour standards for floor marking:

  • Yellow – Pertains to work cells, aisle ways, and traffic lanes.
  • White – Pertains to non-coloured fixtures and equipment.
  • Blue/ Green/ Black – Pertains to raw materials, WIP (work in progress), and finished products.
  • Orange – Pertain to materials for inspection.
  • Red – Pertains to red tag areas, rework, scrap, and defects.
  • Photoluminescent – Identifies egress directions in light-out emergencies.
  • Red and White Stripes – Spaces that are to be kept clear for compliance purposes.
  • Black and White Stripes – Spaces that are to be kept clear for operational reasons.
  • Yellow and Black Stripes – Spaces that may pose physical and health hazards.
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GHS Label

The United Nations set GHS or Globally Harmonized System as a means of classifying and labelling chemicals. In the United States, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration adopted this regulation on March 26, 2012. There are six GHS elements to be familiar with:

  • Signal word
  • GHS symbol
  • Manufacturer information
  • First Aid
  • Hazard Statements
  • Product Identifiers

GHS labelling is not required; employers can always opt to make their labels. Furthermore, they may continue to use the identification labels provided by the Hazardous Material Identification System or take inspiration from the hazard identification system of the U.S. National Fire Protection Association.

With this knowledge and proper labelling on your workspace, employers can increase security, productivity, and customer and employee safety.